Thursday, March 23, 2017

3384

3384

Posted by E.L.A on 2013-04-05 13:37:50

Tagged: , Getty Images Middle East , Food , Freshness , Growth , Agriculture , Horizontal , Outdoors , Turkey , Fruit , Tree , Natural Condition , Winter , Day , Istanbul , Healthy Lifestyle , Hanging , Pomegranate , Color Image , No People , Photography , Healthy Eating , Focus On Foreground , Pomegranate Tree , 186715905 , 1113 , 101113

Konstantin Lipchak. Chef of Gastrorock Pub

Konstantin Lipchak. Chef of Gastrorock Pub

I’m 21. I first got to the restaurant as a cook, when I was 17.
I like to cook since childhood. I prepared my first dish when I was 3. These were fried eggs that I cooked under guidance of my parents. This rather funny case was, perhaps, decisive of my fate. I can’t imagine myself outside kitchen. I can’t do anything else, and why should I? If I manage to cook well, then I will improve myself in this area.

Read more: foodnchef.com/portfolio/konstantin-lipchak-chef-of-gastro…

Posted by foodnchef on 2013-07-08 07:55:21

Tagged: , foodnchef , foodnchef.com , slyadnev , food , chef , restaurant , drink , gourmet , cooking , dinner , preparation , eating , healthy , professional , job , meal , art , lifestyles , perfection , elegance , portrait , lunch , appetizer , cafe , recipe , ingredient , book , image , backgrounds , list , cookbook , dishware , color , spice , object , shopping , contemporary , cuisine , shot , focus , story , Lipchak , gastrorock pub

Tomato Tomate Tomaten Tomatoes Pomodoro Food Essen Nahrung

Tomato Tomate Tomaten Tomatoes Pomodoro Food Essen Nahrung

– (C) Fully copyrighted. Images strictly only available with written royalty agreement. Bilder generell nur mit schriftl. Honorarvereinbg.

Posted by hn. on 2013-03-20 09:47:57

Tagged: , copyright , copyrighted , eat , eating , ernährung , essen , food , gemüse , gesund , gesundheit , health , healthy , heiconeumeyer , nahrung , nourish , nourishment , paradeiser , pomodoro , Tomate , Tomaten , tomato , tomatoes , vegetable , vegetables , vitamin , vitamins

Display Panel, Port Arthur Historic Site _img 0254

Display Panel, Port Arthur Historic Site _img 0254

BEST VIEWED FULL SCREEN

© Irwin Reynolds, all rights reserved. If you are interested in using one of my images or would like a high quality fine art print, please send me an email (irwin_reynolds@yahoo.com.au).

READ ME

Sir George Arthur was Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen’s Land (as Tasmania was then called) from 1824 to 1836. In fact, for all practical purposes he functioned as Governor. He was a stern, often disliked, but competent administrator.

In the eyes of the British government, Van Diemen’s Land was first and foremost a gaol. With this Arthur fully agreed and he set himself the task of making it an efficient gaol aimed at controlling the behaviour of the convicts in his charge and, where possible, reforming them. For this to happen he believed that discipline should be firm, graduated in severity, consistent and impartial–and administered with an almost mathematical precision.

The majority of the convicts sent to the island were put to work on government projects or were assigned to free settlers to work their land grants. However, convicts who committed serious offences after their arrival could well find themselves in “secondary” punishment stations such as Sarah Island (see my images 0224 to 0226) or Port Arthur.

At the direction of George Arthur, the latter was first established in 1830 as a small logging camp, using convict labour to produce sawn timber for government projects. From 1833, when the settlement at Sarah Island was closed, Port Arthur was organised into a punishment station for repeat offenders from all the Australian colonies and it continued to operate in this capacity until 1877.

As a boy in school I learned that Port Arthur was a fearsome gulag, a place of brutal punishment and unrelenting cruelty. However, the truth is more complicated. The settlement was designed specifically to provide the most severe level of discipline in Arthur’s system of convict management and there was certainly brutality, including the infamous floggings with the cat-o’-nine-tails. But Port Arthur also represented a serious attempt at prison reform based in large measure on the ideas of Jeremy Bentham, the British philosopher, and John Howard, the pioneering prison reformer. Whatever the shortcomings of their theories—and they were serious—their aim was to reform the men who went through the system. “To grind rogues into honest men,” as Bentham put it.

On another level, Port Arthur was also a place of major industrial production where 30 or more trades were practiced and taught—shoe making, carpentry, shipbuilding, blacksmithing, baking and brick making to name a few. And for those convicts who were able to maintain acceptable behaviour there were genuine opportunities. While the system ground many down, others learned a trade and went on to successful careers after emancipation. And at Port Arthur convicts lived in a healthy outdoor environment, received three meals a day, and were provided with medical care. In contrast, most of the prisons (and the infamous prison ‘hulks’) in England at the time were overcrowded, rat infested places where convicts were often underfed and where typhus was rampant.

Even for free people on the streets of London life was grim. The social and economic consequence of the agrarian and industrial revolutions and the mass demobilisation—and abandonment—of veterans who had served in a series of British wars meant that, for many, living conditions were intolerable. It has been estimated that as much as 85% of London’s population lived in tenement slums or in the streets and alleyways where orphaned children and homeless adults competed with rats for scraps of food—a situation in which many felt they were faced with a choice between stealing or starving.

As a final note I might add that, having spent a significant part of my professional career working with prison populations, I have little doubt that in 150 years our descendants will look back and be appalled at the shortcomings of our present criminal justice system.

Note: For more more photographs and additional information about Port Arthur, see my other images in this series (images 0254 to 0264)

Posted by Irwin Reynolds photo eXpressions on 2014-07-15 11:38:10

Tagged: , Port Arthur penal station , Port Arthur , Port Arthur Historic Site , Port Arthur Tasmania , Australian historic sites , Tasmania , Van Diemen’s Land , Port Arthur penal settlement , Australian convict system , convicts in Australia , convicts in Tasmania , convicts in Van Diemen’s Land , Lieutenant Governor Sir George Arthur , Governor George Arthur , treatment of convicts at Port Arthur , Australian penal settlements , Tasmanian penal settlements , Tasmanian historic sites , World Heritage sites , Topaz Adjust , Topaz Detail

Healthy Food in Fashion Fall Gala

Healthy Food in Fashion Fall Gala

Image © Amanda Silvana Coen for Inhabitat

Healthy Food in Fashion Fall Gala event taking place at the New York Academy of Medicine in New York City on October 12, 2011.

Posted by Ecouterre on 2011-10-14 04:10:34

Tagged: , Healthy Food in Fashion Fall Gala , Healthy Food in Fashion , Fall Gala , Healthy Food , Fashion , Fall , Gala , Ecouterre , healthy , vegan , vegetarian , New York Academy of Medicine , food , vegan food , vegetarian food , Study , Tara St. James , Study NY , Novacas , Victoria Bartlett , John Bartlett , GUNAS , Tommy Hilfiger , Russell Simmons , Robin Quivers , ethical fashion , sustainable fashion , eco fashion , green fashion , Philippines

Salmon with carrot puree, ginger and spicy sauces

Salmon with carrot puree, ginger and spicy sauces

This dish has beautiful colors. It is very simple, without fat, cream, butter.

See more at: foodnchef.com/recipe-from-jean-pierre-jacob-roasted-salmo…

Posted by foodnchef on 2013-08-09 14:27:13

Tagged: , foodnchef , foodnchef.com , slyadnev , food , chef , restaurant , drink , gourmet , cooking , dinner , preparation , eating , healthy , professional , job , meal , art , lifestyles , perfection , elegance , portrait , lunch , appetizer , cafe , recipe , ingredient , book , image , backgrounds , list , cookbook , dishware , color , spice , object , shopping , contemporary , cuisine , shot , focus , story , salmon. carrot puree , no-cls-info , rejected-from-cls-pool

Fish and lemon

Fish and lemon

by dianyismirilda – www.roomtheagency.com/image/stock-photos-11851604-fish

Posted by RooM_Global on 2015-02-14 18:40:07

Tagged: , food , meal , fish , lemon , healthy

Tomato Tomate Tomaten Tomatoes Pomodoro Food Essen Nahrung

Tomato Tomate Tomaten Tomatoes Pomodoro Food Essen Nahrung

– (C) Fully copyrighted. Images strictly only available with written royalty agreement. Bilder generell nur mit schriftl. Honorarvereinbg.

Posted by hn. on 2013-03-20 09:38:44

Tagged: , copyright , copyrighted , eat , eating , ernährung , essen , food , gemüse , gesund , gesundheit , health , healthy , heiconeumeyer , nahrung , nourish , nourishment , paradeiser , pomodoro , Tomate , Tomaten , tomato , tomatoes , vegetable , vegetables , vitamin , vitamins

Tomato Tomate Tomaten Tomatoes Pomodoro Food Essen Nahrung

Tomato Tomate Tomaten Tomatoes Pomodoro Food Essen Nahrung

– (C) Fully copyrighted. Images strictly only available with written royalty agreement. Bilder generell nur mit schriftl. Honorarvereinbg.

Posted by hn. on 2013-03-20 09:45:27

Tagged: , copyright , copyrighted , eat , eating , ernährung , essen , food , gemüse , gesund , gesundheit , health , healthy , heiconeumeyer , nahrung , nourish , nourishment , paradeiser , pomodoro , Tomate , Tomaten , tomato , tomatoes , vegetable , vegetables , vitamin , vitamins

Image from page 115 of “Outdoor opportunities; the raising care of small animals, birds and plants; a practical treatise on the raising and care of small animals, birds and plants for profit and pleasure” (1922)

Image from page 115 of

Identifier: outdooropportuni00outd
Title: Outdoor opportunities; the raising care of small animals, birds and plants; a practical treatise on the raising and care of small animals, birds and plants for profit and pleasure
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Outdoor enterprise publishing co., Kansas City, Mo. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Domestic animals. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Kansa City, Mo., Outdoor enterprise publishing co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ove is merely to give a slight idea of the vastquantities in which they are used, and this will give you anidea of the large commercial demand for Cavies. The de-mand for baby pigs is at nearly all times of the year aheadof the supply. Most laboratories desire them when fromnine to twelve ounces in weight, and again others want them 108 OUTDOOR OPPORTUNITIES of a larger size. Some desire only males and others wantonly females, but the majority of them do not care whetherthey get males or females, so long as they are healthy. The Cavy is generally known as the LIFE SAVER, be-cause it gives its own life to let others live. Some peoplehave the idea that it is cruel to use Cavies for this pur-pose, but at the same time we all have to admit and agreethat it is better to take the life of an animal than the lifeof a HUMAN. The Cavy is absolutely the best animal touse for this purpose, as they are very easy to handle, do notscratch nor bite, and are very quick to show symptoms ofirregularity.

Text Appearing After Image:
TWO CHOICE BLACK SPECIMENS The Cavy is also good for food. The meat value of theCavy can hardly be estimated. It is regarded far more nu-tritious than most any other kind of meat. Many banquetsare held where the Cavy is the main item on the menu. Al-though, because of the scarcity of stock for this purpose, itwill probably be some time before they will be more generallyused for food purposes. There are many ways of preparingthe Cavy, and they can be prepared about the same as therabbit. Their fur, too, is of great value, and is very adaptableto many purposes. Caps, gloves and even coats are beingmade of their furs. When the supply of Cavies becomes moreabundant, then their fur, no doubt, will be more commer-cialized. THE CAVY INDUSTRY 109 The Cavy, like nearly every other animal, has its placein the SHOW WORLD. Practically every live stock showhas an exhibit of Cavies, and no show, large or small, iscomplete without a display of Cavies. The best displays areusually found at the Chicag

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-26 12:58:00

Tagged: , bookid:outdooropportuni00outd , bookyear:1922 , bookdecade:1920 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Outdoor_enterprise_publishing_co___Kansas_City__Mo___from_old_catalog_ , booksubject:Domestic_animals___from_old_catalog_ , bookpublisher:Kansa_City__Mo___Outdoor_enterprise_publishing_co_ , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:115 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection